PROS & CONS

UP isn’t for everyone, so here are the pros and cons of a few alternatives you could consider.

For each option we recommend you estimate your expected costs and benefits, expected value, and/or return on investment. You’re essentially comparing the amount of value you can create and capture for yourself with your current life plan (or lack thereof) versus with an UP-based life plan versus with a non-UP-based program. Use your imagination and math skills as best you can.  

If you don’t regularly do this when making important life decisions, you might use this decision as a good opportunity to start practicing.

(1) Continue with your “business as usual” approach to life

Pros: No learning curve, less financially expensive upfront, less time-consuming upfront, more privacy

Cons: Very unlikely to achieve as much success, significantly more likely to become derailed, more financially expensive over time, far more time-consuming over time, more dangerous

Summary: This makes sense if you don’t believe in UP’s design principles, you deeply dislike working with others, you are deeply resistant to significant improvements in your life now or you currently have no discretionary time or capital to allocate. Note UP can be designed to limit your need to work with many people (i.e. your UP Coach could be your single point of contact for your UP Team). It will also likely help you obtain more time and capital, but it sometimes takes significant effort to make this happen. If you are “too busy to get unbusy” then you should ask yourself if that’s a reason for or against doing an UP. Choosing this option means you will very likely underperform, waste a lot of time and money, and lose out on a lot of potential value. 

(2) Do an UP-like program completely by yourself

Pros: Less financially expensive upfront, more privacy

Cons: Very unlikely to achieve as much success, significantly more likely to become derailed, more financially expensive over time, far more time-consuming over time, more dangerous

Summary: This makes sense if you currently have limited discretionary capital to allocate or you deeply dislike working with others. You will hopefully make progress on your own, but it will likely be limited. Running an UP is far harder and more complicated than it seems and is usually a team effort. You’ll likely “recreate the wheel” and underperform, which means a lot of wasted time and money and missed value. This is analogous to an Olympic athlete “going it alone” to win gold (i.e. no coach, no teammates, no judges, no support crew, no fans, etc.). 

(3) Do an UP-like program with a team you manage yourself

Pros: Less financially expensive upfront, more privacy

Cons: Unlikely to achieve as much success, more likely to become derailed, more financially expensive over time, more time-consuming over time, more dangerous

Summary: This makes sense if you have believe you won’t benefit from UP’s coaching, accumulated experience or infrastructure. If you are resistant to coaching or unwilling to sometimes defer to experts or data this is a reasonable option for you. This option is analogous to an Olympic athlete going for gold by self-coaching and building a support team from scratch. Through experience we have found that if you’re able to think and execute at a level to actually do this, then co-creating an UP with an UP Coach and using the UP infrastructure often makes sense. You would expertly take advantage of UP’s comparative advantages when it was cost-effective for you.

(4) Do an alternative commercial upgrade program 

You could consider doing or participating in existing commercial programs like a CFAR Workshop, Designing Your Life, The Hoffman Process or Unleash the Power WithinWe’re not necessarily endorsing these programs, but they may be worth considering depending on your unique situation. Part of UP is helping you decide among the thousands of programs and tools available and incorporating the most valuable ones into your personal UP. Our approach is complementary, not competitive. 

Pros: Potentially less financially expensive upfront, potentially less time-consuming upfront, potentially better evidence supporting positive outcomes, potential cohort effect

Cons: Unclear whether you will achieve as much success, may ignore significant life areas in need of upgrading, may have less customization

Summary: This makes sense if you don’t believe in UP’s design principles or you prefer significantly more established programs. Note UP can be designed to have a significant experiential or cohort element. And of course any existing commercial program may be subsumed into your UP.